Library News

The Polaris ILS now available in Australia and New Zealand

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 41 min ago
(April 27, 2015). Innovative announced that the Polaris ILS is now available as a solution for libraries in Australia and New Zealand. Innovative has been a provider of library technology to the region for decades and will leverage this expertise for its new Polaris ILS customers.
Categories: Library News

Boopsie Signs The Regional Automation Consortium (TRAC) 170 Libraries throughout Alberta to go mobile with Boopsi

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 41 min ago
(April 27, 2015). Library patrons throughout Alberta will soon have on-demand access to ebooks, databases and other trusted library resources from any mobile device. Boopsie Inc., the leading mobile platform-as-a-service provider for libraries worldwide, today announced it has been selected by The Regional Automation Consortium (TRAC), the largest library consortium in Alberta, to develop a customized mobile app for its more than 170 member libraries.
Categories: Library News

Cataloging in Publication (CIP) Data Block to be revised summer 2015

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 41 min ago
(April 27, 2015). The Library of Congress announced that a new version of the CIP Data Block, the cataloging information printed by publishers at the front of the book, will be implemented by the Cataloging in Publication Program this summer, no earlier than July 1, 2015.
Categories: Library News

Dublin Business School implements PlumX

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 41 min ago
(April 27, 2015). The Dublin Business School, Ireland's largest independent third level college, is the first institution in Ireland to take advantage of the unique research metrics provided by PlumX from Plum Analytics, an EBSCO company. DBS is confident that PlumX will play a key role in exposing its faculty's research output and promoting its value to current and prospective students, and to the academic community.
Categories: Library News

Powell River Public Library selects SirsiDynix's SaaS solution

Library Technology Reports - 12 hours 41 min ago
(April 27, 2015). Powell River Public Library has signed a seven-year agreement with SirsiDynix for the BLUEcloud LSP, powered by Symphony. Library staff are working directly with SirsiDynix consultants to configure the LSP so that Powell River Library can best serve its community.
Categories: Library News

Library as classroom: What’s the big flippin’ deal? — A TTW Guest Post by Jolene Nechiporenko

Tame the Web - 12 hours 59 min ago

In my hyperlinked library class we’ve been learning about the library as classroom and the benefits of the flipped classroom.  The flipped classroom lends itself to the newer concept of teaching and learning, the active, community centered, collaborative, group learning in which both students and instructors can be learners or teachers.

What is a flipped classroom? The flipped or inverted classroom assigns pre-class, often an online video, pod cast, or reading material, homework and then utilizes class time to complete an active discussion or learning exercise.  “Lectures are moved online to be viewed before class, and classroom time is dedicated to learning activities that require students to engage concepts at a higher level in a group setting and with an instructor at hand to answer questions, give feedback, and prompt reexamination of key ideas.” (Baepler, Walker, & Driessen, 2014)

What’s so great about a flipped classroom?  Flipping the classroom offers new opportunities to both students and instructors that the traditional classroom does not.  Among these opportunities is flexibility for both the students and the instructors.  Students can access, ‘at home’ materials online wherever and whenever they want thanks to the incorporated technology. These recordings or materials remain available to students for repeated use.  “It allows a blended, (online and face-to-face) and self-paced instruction more aligned to how this generation of students learn.” (Brunsell & Horejsi, 2013)

Flipping saves time in the long run.  Instructors record their lecture only once until they feel the need to make changes or updates and students can view/listen to the material as many times as they feel necessary.  This process, known as ‘off-loading’ allows for better use of classroom time. Kim Miller explains off-loading as it pertains to information literacy instruction “…it’s hard to jump into more complex application and exploratory activities during a traditional 50 or 60 minute class if students don’t have a basic foundation on which to build advanced skills.  Off-loading the procedural instructions, like how to navigate the library’s website or basic catalog searching, to pre-class activities can free up in-class time for librarians to help students work through more complex activities.” (Miller, 2013)

Off-loading provides for better use of classroom time which can foster active, collaborative learning.  “Engaging students in active learning during class gives them an opportunity to think critically about what they are leaning, something often lacking in traditional library instruction.” (Fawley, 2014)  “The [Horizon] report notes, “Students are increasingly evaluated…on the success of the group dynamic,” as well as the outcome.  This might involve peer evaluation and self-reflection in addition to review of the group’s work. (as quoted in Stephens, 2012)”

“Thanks to social-networking software, information can flow not just from teachers to learners but in multiple directions: among students, from students to classroom teachers, from teacher-librarians to classroom teachers and students.” (Loertscher, 2008). In this ideal environment, instructors can assume the role of student and students have the capability to be the instructor. “When an assignment is given, everyone-teachers, librarians, students, and other specialists- can comment, coach, suggest, recommend, and discover together, and push everyone toward excellence.” (Loertscher, 2008)

Why should libraries be interested in flipped classrooms?  It’s ideal for an instructor to collaborate with a teacher librarian and have their class take place in the learning commons where a world of resources are readily available to the learner.  Flipped classrooms are often found in libraries, especially in the information commons.  In addition, the flipped classroom can be applied to information literacy instruction in which the librarian is the actual instructor.  “Libraries are increasingly called on to pursue innovative educational initiatives in order to remain engaged with a user base that is beginning to expect more personalized, mobile, digital, and responsive information services. (Booth, 2011)

Want more information?  Check out this great info graphic:

References

Booth, C. (2011). Reflective teaching, Effective learning. American Library Association.

Brunsell, E.,& Horejsi, M. (2013) Flipping you classroom in one “Take”.  Science Teacher, 80(3), 8.

Fawley, N. (2014, September 1). Flipped Classrooms. American Libraries.

Knewton. (2011, August, 29). The flipped classroom. [Infographic] Retrieved fromhttp://www.knewton.com/blog/education-infographics/flipped-classroom-infographic/

Loertscher, D. (2008, November 1). Flip this classroom. School Library Journal.

Miller, K. (2013, February 25).  Flipping Out: Preflip planning. Retrieved from ACRLog.

Miller, K. (2013, March 28).  Flipping Out: Reflection upon landing. Retrieved from ACRLog.

Stephens, M. (2012, April 25). Learning everywhere [Web log post]. Library Journal. Retrievedfrom http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/04/opinion/michael-stephens/learning-everywhere-office-hours/

 

Jolene Nechiporenko is a senior student in the Master of Library and Information Science online degree program through San Jose State University’s School of Information. She lives with her family in North Dakota and plans to pursue a career in librarianship.

 

Categories: Library News

Backstage expands metadata services team to the Northeast

Library Technology Reports - Sun, 2015-04-26 15:16
(April 21, 2015). Compelled by strong demand from libraries and publishers for flexible, customized solutions, Backstage Library Works (www.bslw.com) has expanded its metadata services division with a second location now operating in their preservation service center in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Categories: Library News

Michigan: Technologies and Trends Workshop

Tame the Web - Sun, 2015-04-26 06:38

Mark your calendar now for an exciting opportunity to attend a very special event in which you will “explore cutting edge trends” in “evolving libraries.”

Opening keynote speaker, Michael Stephens will speak about how libraries can play a vital role in how “emerging technologies” can change the way we “live and learn.”

Other scheduled presenters include: Kyle Felker and Kristin Meyer from Grand Valley State University, Amy James and Elizabeth Walker from Spring Arbor University, Sonya Schryer Norris, Library of Michigan and Rebecca Renirie from Central Michigan University.

Registration

Earlybird Registration Deadline: May 22, 2015

Advance Registration Deadline: June 4, 2015

For more information and registration details, go to: http://www.milibraries.org/events/technologies-and-trends-workshop/

 

Categories: Library News

Scholastic To Sell Educational Technology Business To Houghton Mifflin Harcourt For $575 Million To Focus On Global Core Children's Books And Supplemental Education Businesses

Library Technology Reports - Fri, 2015-04-24 15:13
(April 24, 2015). Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its Educational Technology and Services ("EdTech") business to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Company ("HMH") (NASDAQ: HMHC) for $575 million in cash. EdTech had $249 million in revenues and $40 million in operating income in the 2014 fiscal year ended May 31, 2014. Revenues were $175 million and operating income was $17 million for the first nine months of the current fiscal year ending May 31, 2015. Scholastic expects net proceeds from the sale, after taxes, transaction fees, and other expenses, of approximately $360 - $370 million.
Categories: Library News

Build a Circuit & Learn to Program an Arduino in a Silicon Valley Hackerspace

LITA Blog - Fri, 2015-04-24 12:05
Panel of Inventors & Librarians Working Together for a More Creative Tomorrow A LITA Preconference at 2015 ALA Annual

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference

Friday, June 26, 2015, 8:30am – 4:00pm

Computers have changed our lives, but what do we really know about them? Library/information centers can provide answers. Via this hackerspace hosted innovative and experiential session, attendees will learn practical skills such as soldering and learning the basics of Arduino programing and being able to create and adapt programs for their own needs. A panel of Silicon Valley insiders and librarians will share how their institutions programs on programming contribute to analytical thinking.

This experiential session is for anyone, with or without experience, who is curious about the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) / Do-It-Together (DIT) movement, and how it can help libraries. Come join LITA at Noisebridge, for a day at one of the first US hackerspaces. In the morning, attendees will learn to solder their own limited edition LITA project, learn the basics of electronics, and leave not only with the projects they made and inspiration to experiment on their own, but also with ideas for implementation of hackerspaces in their libraries.

There will be an afternoon panel lead by a Silicon Valley inventor and library colleagues from School, Public and University Libraries that will provide different perspectives of how a hackerspace and its programming can provide a catalyst for lifelong learning in students/patrons, and how libraries can remain relevant and supportive far into the future. The discussion will include helpful hints to decide what type of space and tools are is right for your institution. Finally there will be a choice of experiential small group projects along with tours of the space.

An additional materials fee of $25, payable at the door, may apply for this session

Additional resources

A Librarian’s Guide to Makerspaces
Mitch Altman TedxBrussels talk
Tod Colgrove TedxReno Talk
Castilleja School Bourn Idea Lab
The Maker Jawn Initiative at the Free Library of Philadelphia
Arduino

Presenters:

  • Mitch Altman, Co-founder of Noisebridge, President and CEO of Cornfield Electronics
  • Tod Colegrove, Head of DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library, University of Nevada – Reno
  • Angi Chau, Director of Bourn Idea Lab, Castilleja School (Palo Alto,CA)
  • Brandon (BK) Klevence, Maker Mentor and Prototyper, The Maker Jawn Initiative (Philadelphia, PA)
  • Tara M Radniecki, Engineering Librarian at DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library at the University of Nevada, Reno
  • Daniel Verbit, MLIS Candidate, University of Alabama

Where:

The fun will take place at the well known Noisebridge hackerspace. Accessible using the BART system.

Sponsor:

SparkFun is an online retail store that sells the bits and pieces to make your electronics projects possible. Whether it’s a robot that can cook your breakfast or a GPS cat tracking device, our products and resources are designed to make the world of electronics more accessible. Learn more at https://learn.sparkfun.com/

Registration:

Cost

  • LITA Member $235 (coupon code: LITA2015)
  • ALA Member $350
  • Non-Member $380

How-to

To register for any of these events, you can include them with your initial conference registration or add them later using the unique link in your email confirmation. If you don’t have your registration confirmation handy, you can request a copy by emailing alaannual@compusystems.com. You also have the option of registering for a preconference only. To receive the LITA member pricing during the registration process on the Personal Information page enter the discount promotional code: LITA2015

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference
Call ALA Registration at 1-800-974-3084
Onsite registration will also be accepted in San Francisco.

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org

Categories: Library News

Tips for Managing Electronic Resources

LITA Blog - Fri, 2015-04-24 09:00

Credit: Pixabay user Geralt, CC0 Public Domain

Last fall, I unexpectedly took on the electronic resources management (ERM) role at my university. Consequently, I had to teach myself–on the fly–how to manage 130+ electronic resources, along with a budget of several hundred thousand dollars. My initial six months focused on finances, licensing, and workflows rather than access, discoverability, or other key issues. So here are some life-saving tips for all you new e-librarians, because I know you didn’t learn this in library school!

Let’s start, as always, with the users.

Evaluate user needs.

Are you new at your job? Then begin by conducting a needs assessments, formal or informal. Check the programs and course offerings to make sure they still align with the e-resources for which you pay. Seek out faculty, colleagues, and students to get a sense of what resources they assign, use, or see used. Pull usage statistics from each database–and be sure to cross-reference this vendor data with web analytics because vendor data can be self-serving to the point of fictitious. Do your users use each resource enough to justify its cost? And they do really require the level of access you’re paying for? If not, can the resources be marketed and usage increased? And if there’s just no market, can those funds be reallocated and more relevant sources acquired?

Be budget-conscious.

Budgets are a huge consideration for any e-resources manager given that libraries are constantly absorbing budget cuts while vendors raise prices 3-5% a year, on average. Can your library afford to provide the resources it currently offers? More importantly, can the funds be used better? Can you save ten thousand dollars on one contract simply by renegotiating the number of concurrent users so as to reflect enrollment? Can you review your databases for duplication of content? Can you tap free, open access resources to plug content gaps or replace proprietary platforms? Can you talk to vendors and peruse old records to check for any unused credits lying around? And above all, how can you make the case for spending more money on electronic resources?

Negotiate terms.

Often you don’t actually need to throw more money at e-resources to get the best value. Most vendor reps are authorized to reduce off-the-shelf pricing by 20-25% without consulting their boss, and if you push hard enough–especially with smaller or longstanding service providers with a stake in the clientele–you can save potentially huge sums that can then be reallocated to purchase more databases or ebooks. And even if you don’t get a big discount, at least you can get special add-ons or other privileges. But you have be willing to negotiate and drive a hard bargain. Don’t be mean, because vendors are people too–usually very nice people; I’m Facebook friends with several. But we have to remember that our first duty is to get the best value for our taxpayers or students, not to “be nice” to the private sector and hand them all our money without demur.

Take advantage of add-ons.

Even if you aren’t a tough negotiator, you can derive maximum benefit from your subscriptions by exploring untapped services and add-ons most vendors provide. Want to market an e-resource? Check with the vendor-chances are that they can provide free web-based training and marketing materials. Annoyed that a database doesn’t integrate with your discovery layer? Talk to the vendor’s tech team; chances are that you can work something out. And major subscriptions often come with package deals and free add-ons. For example, libraries that use OCLC’s WorldShare as their ILS may be surprised to discover that ContentDM comes bundled with a WMS subscription.

Think consortia.

Speaking of packages, remember the value of group or consortial deals! We save 15% on our EBSCO databases through our free membership in an independent college consortium. Scan your environment to see if there are any great consortial arrangements out there. If not, consider initiating one with area libraries that have similar user populations and information needs. Talk to your state association and regional network or cooperative as well as to folks at your university. That said, be sure to evaluate critically the e-resources and terms of each consortial deal–beware of paying for stuff you don’t need, let alone paying twice for databases you already have.

Learn to love documentation.

Document everything. Seriously. When I started my position, there was no systematic workflow or documentation in place, older invoices were packed loose into folders, and invoices would trickle in randomly through snail mail. I created budget spreadsheets listing databases, vendors, pricing, and period of service; digitized and classified a year’s worth of records; and converted the system to e-invoicing. I also created a master password list for all administrative logins and a contact list for the reps and tech support for each e-resource. Not only does this streamline your workflows and preempt internal audits, but also enables you to document what e-resources you have, how much money you have saved, and how much money you can spend before the new fiscal year.

Read the contracts.

Read licensing agreements and contracts before signing. PLEAZ. Words are negotiable, same as prices. Can you tweak the wording to soften your legal obligations and remove financial penalties for violating the terms of use? Can you demand a VPAT documenting the e-resource’s accessibility? Can you add a clause excluding the library from liability if a user or advocacy group sues because disabled users cannot access the e-resource? Can you give the library a quick out clause in cases of multiyear contracts? Can you get reimbursed if the e-resource goes offline for an extended period? . . . In short, can you modify the standard contract? In all cases, the answer is yes. You can.

Ensure legal compliance.

Credit: Pixabay user Geralt, CC0 Public Domain

Be sure your institution is complying with the terms of the contract. You don’t want to get sued or have your access terminated without notice because people didn’t read the contract carefully enough and gave two hundred students access to an e-resource budgeted for only two users.

Closing thought.

Be that person who interrogates assumptions, saves the library money, and better serves staff and end users. If something was done that way for years, chances are it can be done better.

Do you manage electronic resources? Have you done in the past? Please share your tips below!

Categories: Library News

collectionHQ and 3M Announce Partnership

Library Technology Reports - Thu, 2015-04-23 15:12
(April 23, 2015). collectionHQ, the world's leading collection performance improvement solution and 3M, the global leader in library innovation, are pleased to announce their eagerly-anticipated partnership which will offer 3M Cloud Library subscribers the ability to load their circulation data into collectionHQ's ebook module.
Categories: Library News

Gale supports public libraries with new Digital Early Literacy Resource

Library Technology Reports - Thu, 2015-04-23 15:12
(April 23, 2015). Supporting public libraries' life-long learning initiatives, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, is pleased to announce Miss Humblebee's Academy, a new early literacy product that will assist the library's youngest learners in building foundational literacy skills. Partnering with Miss Humblebee LLC., Gale has co-developed a robust product tailored specifically to the public library user, which includes the assessment tools libraries need to measure their impact on early literacy development in their communities. Studies show that participating in quality early learning can boost children's educational attainment and earnings later in life, underscoring the importance for public libraries to provide resources that serve this young audience.
Categories: Library News

Auto-Graphics' SHAREit selected by Access PA and Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC)

Library Technology Reports - Thu, 2015-04-23 15:12
(April 23, 2015). Auto-Graphics and HSLC, on behalf of the Pennsylvania Office of Commonwealth Libraries, announce the selection of Auto-Graphics' SHAREit, as the statewide resource sharing system. After a competitive RFP process including resource sharing and interlibrary loan vendors throughout the nation, Auto-Graphics was selected by HSLC to provide the next Interlibrary loan platform for Access PA, one of the oldest ILL implementations in North America. Auto-Graphics' SHAREit was selected because it meets the needs indicated to HSLC by the Pennsylvania librarians.
Categories: Library News

The Unfortunate Importance of Beauty

The title of Amanda Filipacchi‘s latest novel says it all. So many teens are so very conscious of appearances, I can only imagine that this book will incite discussion. The cover and title alone are likely to inspire certain readers to pick it up.

It also fulfills that frequent request for funny books (the humor here is largely satirical), and will satisfy readers looking for a love story, albeit a unique one. I also appreciate that its two main protagonists are artists, a composer and a costume designer. This is a sophisticated read for smart teens.

FILIPACCHI, Amanda. The Unfortunate Importance of Beauty. 332p. W.W. Norton. Feb. 2015. Tr $25.95. ISBN 9780393243871. LC 2014037010.  

A memorable group of five friends are featured in this wholly original novel filled with plot twists and turns that address the themes of beauty, friendship, and love. Barb, 28, an exquisitely beautiful costume designer, every day painstakingly dons a disguise that makes her ugly. Lily, 25, is a brilliant pianist and composer who, by society’s standards, is deemed unattractive. Georgia is a successful novelist with quick wit. Penelope, supported by her wealthy family, is struggling to find her place after having been kidnapped and held in a coffin several years prior. The fifth member is an ex-cop who was injured when he rescued Penelope. Barb and Lily have been friends for eight years and Barb finds Lily “nothing but beautiful,” though Barb’s perception is admittedly “skewed by affection.” In an attempt to have Strad, a man Lily has loved for years, notice her, she composes music that makes her beautiful. She must go to great lengths to have her music playing while they are together, or else wear a mask that Barb has created. The author weaves amusing elements of farce and fantasy into the story without jarring the narrative. Barb and Lily just want to find true love that is not based on appearances and through a host of preposterous circumstances, their wishes come true. VERDICT Though the characters are not teens, this novel is bound to spark a lively debate about the nature of beauty, whether society’s norms can be changed, and the notion of true love.—Jane Ritter, Mill Valley School District, CA

Categories: Library News

The midnight plan of the repo man /

New At the Library - Thu, 2015-04-23 09:11

    ISBN: 9781466855908
    Author: Cameron, W. Bruce


Categories: Library News

Burnt toast makes you sing good : a memoir of food and love from an American Mid

New At the Library - Thu, 2015-04-23 09:11

    ISBN: 9780670015443
    Author: Flinn, Kathleen


Categories: Library News

Station eleven /

New At the Library - Thu, 2015-04-23 09:11

    ISBN: 9780385353311
    Author: Mandel, Emily St. John, 1979-


Categories: Library News

Bird box /

New At the Library - Thu, 2015-04-23 09:11

    ISBN: 9780062259653
    Author: Malerman, Josh


Categories: Library News

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