Library News

The Invisible Circle

For the last nine months, I’ve been on a mission to get you all to read the great French mystery novelist Paul Halter (posts here and here) and today I’m back with another of his books. As I pointed out in that first post, his books are translated and published by a tiny house called Locked Room International and I had hoped to have a review of one of their non-Halter books, specifically The Killing Needle by Henry Cauvin. Translator John Pugmire makes the case that The Killing Needle‘s detective Maximillien Heller is the “French Sherlock Holmes” which is of particular note since it was originally published 16 years before the first Holmes story. Pugmire makes a strong case that Arthur Conan Doyle may have read The Killing Needle and taken ideas for Holmes from it. I didn’t find myself quite convinced–I didn’t see anything that couldn’t have been found in various other detective stories of the period, particularly Poe’s Dupin stories. But just because I wasn’t convinced doesn’t mean I’m right.  In the end I didn’t find quite enough teen appeal in that book to review here, but if you or your teens are intrigued by the Holmes angle, or just interested in more locked room mysteries, definitely take a look at The Killing Needle.

Meanwhile, today’s review is another Halter book, this one, as I say in my review, seemingly based on Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Just as in Christie’s novel, the characters are trapped on a small island as a mysterious killer goes to work, leaving only themselves as suspects. Another great mystery from Halter, perfect for fans of Christie looking to branch out.

HALTER, Paul. The Invisible Circle. tr. from French by John Pugmire. 152p. Create Space/Lockedroominternational.com. Jun. 2014. pap. $19.99. ISBN 9781497336834.

Halter, the French master of the locked-room mystery, tries his hand at a remake of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, with a bit of Arthurian legend thrown in for good measure. Madge Pearson is summoned by her creepy uncle Gerry to a deserted island-castle in Cornwall where she finds several other seemingly unrelated guests. Her uncle declares the castle to be standing on the ground of the “real” Camelot, gives each guest an Arthurian nickname, and then proceeds to predict that one of them will kill him in an impossible fashion. Sure enough, Gerry is murdered and the guests are trapped on the island, convinced that one of them must be the killer. Perhaps because of the very small cast, Halter’s characterization this time out is much more nuanced, although as always the real treat is the seemingly impossible twists and turns of the mystery as it is solved, unsolved, and solved again.  Originally published in 1996, and set 60 years before in 1936, the novel has an air of timelessness while still nicely capturing the milieu of Christie’s and Dorothy Sayers’s great novels of the 1930s, and teen fans of those authors, or Halter’s other locked-room works, should love this one.—Mark Flowers, John F. Kennedy Library, Vallejo, CA

Categories: Library News

Analytics for Social media – Summary

David Lee King - Tue, 2014-08-26 09:30

In this series of articles, I’ve been talking about what types of social media analytics my library tracks.

Here’s what I covered:

What’s missing? What do you track that we don’t? I’d love to know – please share in the comments!

Pic by Scott Akerman

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Categories: Library News

Fabulous Debuts

It’s the end of August, and we still have quite a few reviews of summer books to share with you. So don’t let this somewhat clumsy grouping at all diminish your regard for the following three debut novels.

I start with 2 A.M. at The Cat’s Pajamas because, well, great title! And it really does suit for this time of year. Everyone’s busy, about to jump into fall. Enter this slim, delightful novel that feels a bit like a heartfelt sitcom. Also, I can’t remember the last time we had anything set in a jazz club, or starring a 9-year-old aspiring singer. The entire novel is set within a 24-hour period and takes place in Philadelphia, author Marie-Helene Bertino‘s hometown. It is a current Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick, and the B&N site features a nice interview with the author. It will also make a great addition to your holiday book displays come December.

Next up is Dollbaby by Laura Lane McNeal, a Library Reads top pick. I can see recommending this novel to teens who loved The Help or The Secret Life of Bees. It also reminds me of Saving CeeCee Honeycutt. The author was inspired by her love of New Orleans. As she worked to rebuild her home after Hurricane Katrina, she was determined to tell a story of the city and what makes it unique, including its culture and the mix of people who live in close proximity to one another. Read more on the author’s website. This is also a great choice for teens who love books featuring food, for Dollbaby is full of traditional New Orleans dishes.

And finally, for a complete change of pace, let Lauren Quick usher you and your teens into the Halloween season with The Quick, an engrossing, multi-layered, unpredictable Victorian vampire novel. Frankly, this is a spoiler, because it takes quite a while for the novel to reveal its monsters. But its twists and turns will be just the thing for horror readers, especially those willing to tackle a long novel like The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova, which made a big splash with a few dedicated readers in my library when it came out.

BERTINO, Marie-Helene. 2 A.M. at The Cat’s Pajamas. 272p. Crown. Aug. 2014. Tr. $25. ISBN 9780804140232. LC 2013048943.  

It’s 2 A.M. on December 30, New Year’s Eve Eve. Within the next 24 hours, Lorca must find enough money to pay off several fines levied on his jazz club, The Cat’s Pajamas (among other problems: serving underage patrons, people living in the club, and illegal fireworks). Adding to the pressure is his son, who just wants to play with the house band. Later that day, Madeleine (who loves to sing, as did her deceased mother) is expelled from school because a bully ruined her caramel apple, and she—foul of mouth and fast of fist—retaliated; now all she wants to do is find The Cat’s Pajamas and sing, just as her mother did. The young woman’s teacher, Sabrina, feels somewhat responsible for not defending Madeleine, but is even more nervous about seeing Ben, who years ago was the worst prom date ever, and other high school friends at dinner. The three narratives intertwine as the day unfolds, and backstories for each are told in flashbacks and memories. By 2 A.M. on December 31, the protagonists’ paths converge at the club. As so often happens in life, the rhythm and pacing of these lives changes—sometimes things are resolved, sometimes left hanging. A great read for those who like realistic, slice-of-life fiction that doesn’t move at a fast pace but still manages to pack a lot in.—Laura Pearle, Miss Porter’s School, Farmington, CT

MCNEAL, Laura Lane. Dollbaby. 337p. Viking/Pamela Dorman Bks. Jul. 2014. Tr $26.95. ISBN 9780670014736. LC 2013048523.  

This debut novel opens in 1964 when Liberty Bell (Ibby), just shy of her 12th birthday, is dumped by her mother at her unknown paternal grandmother’s somewhat rundown mansion in New Orleans. Ibby’s beloved father has just died and her mother, needing to “figure this whole thing out,” takes off without so much as a backward glance. Ibby is welcomed to her grandmother Fannie’s house by Dollbaby, who along with her mother Queenie, work for Fannie. So begins a remarkable eight-year period for Ibby. Fannie is eccentric, loving, and loyal, but unfortunately needs to make an occasional visit to the local asylum when her grief over past tragedies gets the better of her. She is a notorious sports better who makes quite a good living from her predictions, and hence is known all over New Orleans. Dollbaby and her family have tragedies of their own, but are a loving and solid force in Ibby’s life. They help her see and feel the racial unrest of New Orleans in the ‘60s, but also help redefine for her the concept of family. Teens will be drawn in by this well-crafted coming-of-age story with its plot twists and turns, flashbacks, secrets exposed, and exquisitely drawn characters. An engaging novel that is hard to put down.—Jane Ritter, Mill Valley School District,  CA

OWEN, Lauren. The Quick. 523p. Random. Jun. 2014. Tr $27. ISBN 9780812993271. LC 2013018600.  

James and Charlotte are abandoned by their father at an early age, and James welcomes the chance to travel to the city to become a writer. But London has a dark side, especially in the men who are members of a secretive club, the Aegolius. While Charlotte is stuck nursing their aging great-aunt, James and his partner encounter vampires. James ends up in the middle of a vampire turf war in Victorian London, and Charlotte must try her best to save her brother. Luckily there are others who are studying and fighting the “undid,” so Charlotte is not alone.
 The Quick is not a quick read. The debut novel consists of excerpts from books about vampires, diary entries, and narratives about James and Charlotte, and the characters they meet. Some parts are stronger than others, but invested readers will want to know what happens to the siblings. Teens who love gothic novels will eat this up. These vampires brood and kill—no sweet love story here! Give this to those who enjoyed Cassandra Clare’s Clockwork Angel (S. & S., 2010) and who are ready for a darker, more intellectual read.—Sarah B. Hill, Lake Land College, Mattoon, IL

Categories: Library News

Spydus 9 Self Service goes Live in Masterton, New Zealand

Library Technology Reports - Sun, 2014-08-24 23:16
(August 25, 2014). Civica announced the release of Spydus 9 Self Service, with Masterton District Library in New Zealand as the first customer to go live. Spydus Self Service, now core to Spydus 9, builds on Civica's existing self service offering with added functionality including renewals, amendments to reservations and bookings, and viewing of patron details and summary. The Self Service module is part of the focus on supporting library patrons and providing a range of flexible solutions that cover web access, mobile and self service functions.
Categories: Library News

LITA Kitchen Table Conversations

LITA Blog - Fri, 2014-08-22 14:31

LITA is beginning a series of informal discussions to let members voice their thoughts about the current strategic goals of LITA. The first couple of these “kitchen table talks,” lead by President Rachel Vacek and Vice-President Thomas Dowling, will take place online in September and October (details to follow), and will be followed by in-person dinners at the 2014 LITA Forum in Albuquerque.

The kitchen table talks will discuss LITA’s strategic goals – collaboration and networking; education and sharing of expertise; advocacy; and infrastructure – and how meeting those goals will help LITA better serve you. The talks also align with ALA’s strategic planning process and efforts to communicate the association’s overarching goals of professional development, information policy, and advocacy.

So if you’re coming to Forum (and you really should!), come have a bowl of green chile stew with Rachel or Thomas and let your voice be heard.

Categories: Library News

The house on Mermaid Point /

New At the Library - Fri, 2014-08-22 11:02

    ISBN: 9780425263327
    Author: Wax, Wendy


Categories: Library News

No river too wide /

New At the Library - Fri, 2014-08-22 11:02

    ISBN: 9780778316343
    Author: Richards, Emilie, 1948-


Categories: Library News

Rider University (NJ) selects Sierra Library Services Platform

Library Technology Reports - Fri, 2014-08-22 08:02
(August 21, 2014). Innovative announced that Rider University (Lawrenceville, NJ) has selected the Sierra Library Services Platform and will migrate from a Voyager system provided by Ex Libris. The two campus libraries hold 1.6 million volumes combined.
Categories: Library News

EBSCO's eBook Collection Continues to Expand with Release of 12 New Subject Sets

Library Technology Reports - Thu, 2014-08-21 10:57
(August 21, 2014). EBSCO Information Services announces the release of 12 new EBSCO eBook Subject Sets, which increases the total number to more than 200.
Categories: Library News

Analytics for Social Media – ROI

David Lee King - Thu, 2014-08-21 09:30

In this series of articles, I’ve been talking about what types of social media analytics my library tracks. We’ve already discussed Activity Metrics, Audience Metrics, Engagement Metrics, and Referral Metrics. Today we’ll cover ROI.

This is the best one (and the last, for now). People often ask for the ROI of social media. And true ROI for social media is often hard to show. Sometimes social media managers create a weird, complex “weekly engagement” metric that … well … doesn’t really do much. Why? Their metric tends to only show activity within that single social media tool.

Showing activity within a social media channel is ok. But is that getting more books checked out? Getting people to your programs? Getting people to your website? Nope.

I’ve been trying to get some useful ROI type stats out of all this social media I’ve been tracking. Here’s what I’ve discovered. If you have a better thing to count, please share!

I count two ROI trends:

1. Number of visits to the website per post created. For this number, I divide the total referrals for the month into the number of posts we create, to get the final number. For example, in May we had 865 total referrals and 204 total social media posts. So divide that (and round up), and you get 4. Which means for every social media post we created in May, we achieved four visits to the website.

Again, we’re talking trends here – it’s not an exact science. But still, this stat does show that when staff create social media posts, they drive traffic to our website. Bingo – ROI.

2. Number of interactions per post created. This is similar, but a bit more lightweight. Divide the monthly engagement metric total by the number of posts created for the month. For May, we ended up with 94 interactions per post created.

Lightweight, but tells a nice story. For every post we did in May, we got people to do something – click like, share, comment, favorite, retweet, or watch – 94 times.

Why’s this good? It means they’re interested enough in our content, and therefore the library, to remember it, to share it, to add their thoughts to it. To respond in some way to it. Not a bad thing at all – interest in the library is a good thing!

So – that’s what we’re doing at the moment. What are you tracking? Is it similar? Please share!

Pic from Simon Cunningham

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Categories: Library News

Interview with LITA President, Rachel Vacek

LITA Blog - Thu, 2014-08-21 09:00

What are your responsibilities as LITA president?

The president is the chief spokesperson for LITA and works closely with both LITA’s executive director and the board of directors in identifying and promoting information technology issues that are of interest to the association in all kinds of libraries, both nationally and internationally.

The president leads the board and executive committee meetings, and works closely with the 20-plus committees that serve the association, such as membership development, education, web coordinating, program planning, publishing, and financial advisory, to name a few.

The president also coordinates with the appointed representatives to groups and associations outside LITA, keeps the board informed, and is a proponent for advocacy of library technology issues. The president, in conjunction with the board, also determines the strategic direction for the association and is able to create task forces as needed to put initiatives in motion.

What are your goals for your presidential year?

Accomplishing impactful goals within a one-year period can be a daunting task. It becomes essential to coordinate efforts with the president-elect and past president to keep the forward momentum going. I am focusing on member experience and financial stability.

As someone who has worked in the systems and web librarianship field for years, the concept of user experience has always had special meaning for me. The ability to look at a person’s behaviors, attitudes, and emotions about being a member of LITA is especially important when examining and improving member experience.

When answering the question, “Why join LITA?” I have to evaluate the hard benefits like educational and conference discounts or being able to participate in leadership roles, as well as the softer benefits like opportunities to expand one’s network. I believe that people join LITA because they want to learn something new, help their colleagues, grow their network, and advocate for librarians working with technology.

I will work with many of LITA’s committees, primarily Membership, Education, and Publications, to:

  • Involve enthusiastic, active members who have embraced LITA’s mission and values in making new members feel welcome.
  • Recognize more frequently the outstanding contributions of LITA members.
  • Emphasize that a major benefit of joining LITA is about expanding one’s network and circle of influence, and having fun in the process!
  • Consider the goals of current and potential members. I think the best way to engage LITA members is to help them participate in meaningful and relevant activities that will further their goals and those of the profession.
  • Offer more virtual events and mentoring opportunities that help potential or new members learn more about LITA and establish connections and lifelong friendships. Being able to make these connections virtually is essential, since conference travel can sometimes be financially challenging.

The other goal I mentioned was financial stability. The LITA Financial Strategies Task Force presented a report to the board last year that is packed with timely, practical, and creative solutions for helping to address crucial challenges that all ALA divisions are facing. LITA also recently established a Financial Advisory Committee, and I believe that their work, in conjunction with the efforts of other LITA committees, are crucial to ensuring that LITA remains viable and relevant for years to come.

What are LITA’s goals?

In accordance with ALA’s goals of information policy, professional development, and advocacy, LITA’s four broad goals are:

  1. To foster collaboration and networking among LITA members.
  2. To offer education, publications, and events that inspire and enable members to improve technology integration within their libraries.
  3. To advocate for meaningful legislation, policies, and standards that positively impact the current and future capabilities of libraries that promote equitable access to information and technology.
  4. To improve LITA’s infrastructure in order to serve, educate, and create community for its members.

How will your role as LITA president benefit your own library and institution?

I work at the University of Houston Libraries in Houston, Texas. National recognition is one of the University’s priorities, and one of the Libraries’ strategic directions. Being the president of a national association is both a huge responsibility and an incredibly rewarding experience. With that comes an increase in press, interviews, and open doors, all of which are opportunities to highlight the UH Libraries and UH as outstanding organizations doing amazing things.

Also, because I have established an incredible network both within LITA and now with the leaders of the other divisions, I am able to help my colleagues make connections with others in the profession. I’ve become quite familiar with ALA’s structure and look forward to offering advice on getting involved, connecting colleagues with relevant skills and interests to appropriate groups, and being a sounding board for ideas.

What have you learned about yourself through this experience?

I’ve grown a tremendous amount in just the past year since becoming LITA’s vice-president. I realized that my previous experiences in chairing the UH Libraries’ Strategic Directions Steering Committee, being Chair of the Librarians, and leading numerous other committees, coupled with being a department head, have all prepared me for this endeavor. The experience of leading a board of directors, strategic and budgetary planning, collaborating with other divisions, and driving the organization’s vision is also preparing me for the next stage in my library career.

Categories: Library News

UChicago launches Kuali OLE and new Catalog

Library Technology Reports - Wed, 2014-08-20 16:53
(August 20, 2014). The University of Chicago Library announced its launch of the Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) and a new Catalog based on VuFind.
Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: August 20

LITA Blog - Wed, 2014-08-20 13:54

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing. Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week

Information Technology Specialist, Texas Library Association, Austin, TX

User Experience Librarian, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville,  AR

Web Services Librarian, University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, AL

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a  job posting.

Categories: Library News

Crave the night : midnight breed series book twelve /

New At the Library - Wed, 2014-08-20 10:52

    ISBN: 9780345532640
    Author: Adrian, Lara


Categories: Library News

In the kingdom of ice : the grand and terrible polar voyage of the U.S.S. Jeanne

New At the Library - Wed, 2014-08-20 10:52

    ISBN: 9780385535373
    Author: Sides, Hampton


Categories: Library News

Swets sponsors a new classroom library at Indian Primary School through educational charity, Room To Read

Library Technology Reports - Wed, 2014-08-20 07:52
(August 20, 2014). Swets Information Services, a global organization committed to improving the delivery and use of knowledge worldwide, and the charity Room to Read are delighted to announce the completion of the first joint project funded by donations from Swets; namely the creation of a new classroom library at the Government Primary School Nathu Khadi in India's Uttarakhand province. The library provides facilities for over 100 pupils, aged between 6 and 11, and their four teachers.
Categories: Library News

Arlington Public Library in Texas Migrates to EnvisionWare RFID

Library Technology Reports - Wed, 2014-08-20 07:52
(August 19, 2014). EnvisionWare announced that Arlington Public Library in Texas has migrated to EnvisionWare RFID from a 3M RFID system.
Categories: Library News

On the Cusp

High school is behind you, but you’re not quite an independent adult. Today’s reviews cover one book of essays and stories written during–and one graphic novel memoir written about–the college years.

Marina Keegan was a talented writer who died days after graduating from Yale. She had lined up a position as an editorial assistant at The New Yorker and was on her way toward a literary career. The Opposite of Loneliness is a collection of her writing, some of it originally published in the Yale Daily News.

Keegan was perhaps best known for fighting against the Wall Street recruiting machine that gathered up nearly a quarter of Yale graduates each year. She feared that the lure of money was derailing talented young people from following their passions, and she expressed that fear in her essay Even Artichokes Have Doubts, which is included in the collection.

Over Easy is a lightly fictionalized memoir of a life-changing period in Mimi Pond‘s youth. She was in art school but had run out of money, so she dropped out and got a real job–washing dishes in a diner in Oakland in the early ’70s. Pond is a cartoonist and humor writer. In addition to books, she has written for TV, including The Simpsons.

KEEGAN, Marina. The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories. 208p. Scribner. Apr. 2014. Tr $23. ISBN 9781476753614. LC 2013030131.  

Fans of HBO’s Girls will find a kindred spirit in the person of Marina Keegan. Sadly, this book, a collection of short stories and essays written before she turned 22, will likely be her only, as she was killed in a car crash just five days after graduating college. There is a sense of melancholy in most of the stories, of having to leave your youth behind and not feeling ready to join adulthood. Multiply that melancholia exponentially when you realize Keegan never got to experience adulthood herself. The very first entry is about a girl and the guy she is dating. They’ve never really defined their relationship and it was getting a little rocky when he dies in an accident. At the funeral, does she identify as his girlfriend or was she just a hookup that lasted too long? Even the two stories about women in middle age dealing with aging are still accessible to teen readers who can easily relate to underlying feelings of undesirability or being left behind. The last essay talks about how Marina would like to tell the universe “Here I am” before she dies. Though bittersweet, this collection accomplishes that feat and displays the talent she had to offer before her sad demise.—Jamie Watson, Baltimore County Public Library, MD

POND, Mimi. Over Easy. illus. by Mimi Pond. 271p. Drawn & Quarterly. Apr. 2014. Tr $24.95. ISBN 9781770461536. LC 2013464704.  

As a spectator, Madge admired the waitresses at the Imperial Café, “no-shit gals with names like Bea and Myrna, women who know about real life.” When Madge’s bank account runs out, the listless art school student sets aside her pencils and sketchbooks and dons an apron and order pad. The quirky diner staff and regulars she once spied on and sketched take on dimension as she gets to know them from the other side of the counter. Pond’s hazy green palette evokes the dreamy, aimless California of the 1970s. Her illustrations are unassuming but at times convey realism; readers will feel the grime on Madge’s hands as she wrestles to clean the Imperial’s unwieldy rubber floor mats. The graphic novelist’s narrative takes place in the middle territory after the age of the hippie fizzled but before the angry punk movement congealed. “The 60’s had been so exciting,” the protagonist reminisces, “but now the war was over and everyone was just treading bong water.” Despite the historical context, today’s young adults will sympathize with Madge, who feels she’s been dealt a bad hand by being born at a wrong time. Older teens about to accept the responsibilities of young adult life are sure to connect with the leap Madge makes from passive observer to active participant.—Rachael Myers-Ricker, Horace Mann School, NY

Categories: Library News

It’s Here! The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition #NMChz

Tame the Web - Wed, 2014-08-20 03:17

From Michael: Download the new NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition. I served on the expert panel to select the topics: go.nmc.org/2014arl 

The New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich are releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition at a special session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress 80th General Conference and Assembly. This is the first edition of the NMC Horizon Report that delves into the realm of academic and research libraries in a global context.

The report describes findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving library leaders and staff a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report was designed to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.

“Education professionals across the world have used the higher education editions of the NMC Horizon Report for years as a springboard for discussion around important trends and challenges,” says Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Officer of the NMC and co-principal investigator for the project. “Finally we have been able to produce a report aimed directly at the needs of academic and research libraries — and what we have found is that academic and research libraries are leveraging new technology in some very important and creative ways.”

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption for Academic and Research Libraries
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition identifies “Increasing Focus on Research Data Management for Publications” and “Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery” as fast trends driving changes in academic and research libraries over the next one to two years. The “Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record” and “Increasing Accessibility of Research Content” are mid-range trends expected to accelerate technology use in the next three to five years; and “Continual Progress in Technology, Standards, and Infrastructure” and the “Rise of New Forms of Multidisciplinary Research” are long-range trends that will be impacting libraries for five years and beyond.

“The trends identified by the expert panel indicate that libraries are doing a better job at making their content and research accessible, whether through mobile apps, enriched catalogs, linking data, and user friendly websites or by creating more spaces and opportunities for discovery,” notes Rudolf Mumenthaler, Professor for Library Science at HTW Chur and co-principal investigator for the report. “The outcomes of the report are very compelling and it is an honor for HTW Chur to be deeply involved in this project.”

Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption In Academic and Research Libraries
A number of challenges are acknowledged for presenting barriers to the mainstream use of technology in academic and research libraries. “Embedding Academic and Research Libraries in the Curriculum” and “Rethinking the Roles and Skills of Librarians” are perceived as solvable challenges — those which we both understand and know how to solve. “Capturing and Archiving the Digital Outputs of Research as Collection Material” and “Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery” are considered difficult challenges, which are defined as well understood but with solutions that are elusive. Described as wicked challenges are “Embracing the Need for Radical Change” and “Maintaining Ongoing Integration, Interoperability, and Collaborative Projects,” which are complex to define, much less address.

“ETH-Bibliothek is proud to be a partner of this report,” shares Andreas Kirstein, Vice Director and Head of Media and IT Services at ETH-Bibliothek, and co-principal investigator of the project. “By articulating some of the most daunting challenges that academic and research libraries face, we are already making progress toward solving them.”

Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries
Additionally, the report identifies “Electronic Publishing” and “Mobile Apps” as technologies expected to enter mainstream use in the first horizon of one year or less. “Bibliometrics and Citation Technologies” along with “Open Content” are seen in the second horizon of two to three years; “The Internet of Things” as well as “Semantic Web and Linked Data” are seen emerging in the third horizon of four to five years.

The subject matter in this report was identified through a qualitative research process designed and conducted by the NMC that engages an international body of experts in libraries, education, technology, research, business, and other fields around a set of research questions designed to surface significant trends and challenges and to identify emerging technologies with a strong likelihood of adoption in academic and research libraries. The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Editiondetails the areas in which these experts were in strong agreement.

“This first library edition of the Horizon Report marks some important evolutionary steps,” says Lambert Heller, head of Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover and co-principal investigator of the project. “Academic and research libraries are now being seen as incubators for experimenting with emerging technologies and are even leading the way at many university campuses across the world.”

The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition is available online, free of charge, and is released under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution.

> Download the Report (PDF)

Thumbnail CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 by Andreas Wecker

Categories: Library News

Lehigh University Launches New Open-Source Library Environment

Library Technology Reports - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:49
(August 19, 2014). Lehigh University has launched the Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE), the first university in the nation to implement the open-source, community-based library management system.
Categories: Library News
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